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News Release

April 9, 2014

NOBEL LAUREATES HEADLINE UH CANCER CENTER EVENT ON BRIDGING THE U.S. AND ASIA IN THE FIGHT AGAINST CANCER
Winners of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Medicine to speak at Weinman Symposium on May 5

HONOLULU – Co-recipients of the 2011 Nobel Prize in medicine will headline a roster of experts focusing on bridging the U.S. and Asia in the fight against cancer during this year's Weinman Symposium at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center.

The Symposium takes place on May 5 in the Sullivan Conference Center at the Cancer Center in Kaka'ako, and is free and open to the public. The speaker roster includes Ann Chao, PhD, who grew up on the Big Island and today serves as Director of Cancer Research Programs, East Asia, with the Center for Global Health of the National Cancer Institute. Click here to see the schedule and parking options.

"This year's theme highlights cancer as a global health issue, and shows the pivotal role Hawaii plays in the international efforts to prevent, detect, and treat cancer," said Dr. Michele Carbone, director of the Cancer Center. "Researchers in Hawaii collaborate with scientists across the U.S. and the Asia-Pacific region, and that benefits everyone."

The Nobel laureates speaking at the symposium are Jules A. Hoffmann, PhD, professor of Integrative Biology at the University of Strasbourg Institute for Advanced Studies and an Exceptional Class Research Director (emeritus) at the National Center of Scientific Research (CNRS) in Strasbourg, France, and Dr. Bruce A. Beutler, Regental Professor and director for the Center for the Genetics of Host Defense, and holder of the Raymond and Ellen Willie Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research, in Honor of Laverne and Raymond Willie, Sr., at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

Together with Ralph M. Steinman, Hoffmann and Beutler won the 2011 Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology for their work on discovering underlying mechanisms that trigger activation of innate immunity. The Nobel committee cited their work for opening up new fields of research that could improve vaccination and treatment against infection, cancer and inflammatory diseases.

The Weinman Symposium is supported by the generosity of the Weinman Foundation. In 2010, Barry and Virginia Weinman of Honolulu created the Weinman Foundation Fund for Innovation at the UH Cancer Center with a $1.7 million gift. This fund makes it possible for the Center to invite prominent leaders in cancer research to Hawaiʻi every year. These globally-recognized experts are selected for their work in cancer research and its successful translation into therapy and care. While here, they work with the Cancer Center and establish research collaborations with the faculty.

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